Salmagundi

...now browsing by tag

 
 

Salmagundi Magazine 50th Anniversary Conference This Weekend

Thursday, September 24th, 2015
0921-boyers-editors-sal-office

Executive Editor Peg Boyers and Founder/Editor-In-Chief Robert Boyers. Remember the late 70s/early 80s? I don’t.

Salmagundi Magazine is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary this year. As such, Skidmore, along with the editors of Salmagundi, are hosting a conference this weekend titled, “Belief and Unbelief” featuring twenty-four notable writers and thinkers.

Formally, Salmagundi is a quarterly of the Humanities and Social Sciences that has published Pulitzer Prize winners, MacArthur Award fellows, Nobel laureates, and National Book Award winners and finalists. Informally, Salmagundi is a quarterly of the Humanities and Social Sciences that publishes work by writers you’ll never be as talented as, nor will you want to work hard enough to do so. This conference is a big deal. It’s also a great opportunity to Instagram a picture of James Wood eating a cube of cheese.

You’ll find the schedule and the list of speakers below. Author bios can be found on Salmagundi’s Tumblr.

Friday, September 25th

7 PM: “What Is Belief & What is the Fearful Unbelief?” (opening remarks by Marilynne Robinson followed by general discussion)

Saturday, September 26th

10.15 AM: “Prejudice, Fidelity & ‘Fidelities’” (opening remarks by Anthony Appiah followed by general discussion)

11.45 AM: “The Meaning of ‘Belief’ & ‘Sincerity’ in Literature”(opening remarks by James Wood followed by general discussion)

2.45 PM: “Bien-Pensant Liberalism, Relativism & Truth-Telling” (opening remarks by Jim Miller followed by general discussion)

4.45 PM: “Ideology As Belief: Dangers & Distortions” (opening remarks by Orlando Patterson followed by general discussion)

Sunday, September 27th

10.15 AM: “Realism, The Virtues & Belief in Public Life” (opening remarks by Seyla Benhabib followed by general discussion & audience questions for the entire panel)

Marilynne Robinson / Anthony Appiah / Mary Gordon / Orlando Patterson James Carroll / Seyla Benhabib / Akeel Bilgrami / James Wood /  Phillip Lopate / Jim Sleeper / Jim Miller / Rochelle Gurstein / David Steiner/ Honor Moore/ Jackson Lears/ Charles Molesworth / Terence Diggory/ Regina Janes / Barry Goldensohn / Lorrie Goldensohn / Peg Boyers/ Robert Boyers/ Tom Lewis/ Phillip Glotzbach

Big names, kiddos. Big names.

Check Out the Salmagundi Tumblr Right Now

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

The repulsive, vomit-inducing salmagundi “salad” and the literary journal’s namesake

You may or may not know this, but Bob and Peg Boyers (the Jay-Z/Beyoncé power-couple of the Skidmore English Department) have published a very important and influential literary journal called Salmagundi for the better part of fifty years.

…AND NOW IT’S ON TUMBLR.

The lovely and fashionable Laura Naparstek ’13 runs this, and it all looks pretty solid and together. She’s basically posting old, interesting articles, essays, poems, and excerpts from the Salmagundi archives. You can then reblog them, impressing your nine followers with your worldliness and appreciation for high-culture and maybe getting yourself laid (maybe).

(via Salmagundi)

Boyers in Lapham’s Quarterly

Wednesday, September 19th, 2012

English professor and editor of Salmagundi, Robert Boyers, has been published in jack-of-all-trades literary magazine, Lapham’s Quarterly. The essay–titled “Between the Lines“— is a real doozy, examining the relationship between politics and the novel.

“Politics, in novels we can admire, must always pit ideas against the world as it exists, or might conceivably exist, and allow at every turn for contradiction and irresolution. Irving Howe got it right when he spoke of “the vast respect which the great novelist is ready to offer to the whole idea of opposition, the opposition he needs to allow for in his book against his own predispositions and yearnings and fantasies.” To think of politics and the novel without bearing in mind that commitment to “opposition” is to miss more or less entirely what is central to our great and familiar subject.”

The essay is basically a summary of Boyers’ “Political Novel” class. Even if you’ve taken it, you should still read the essay, because it’s very good.

(via Lapham’s Quarterly)

The Rescheduled Siri Hustvedt Event

Monday, February 21st, 2011

The English Dept.’s  Siri Hustvedt lecture and panel discussion that was canceled at the end of last month because New York was buried under a mountain of snow has been rescheduled for this Tuesday (2/22) at 8pm in Emerson.

Siri Hustvedt, who has written several novels, memoirs, books of essays and short stories, will be on campus for a lecture and panel this Thursday Jan. 27th TUESDAY FEB. 22nd thanks to Salmagundi Magazine and the English Dept..

The evening will begin with a lecture by Hustvedt ‘exploring the relationship between fiction and memoir’ followed by a panel discussion featuring English Dept. fixtures Robert Boyers, Melora Wolff and Greg Hrbek.

Hustvedt has written three novels: The Blindfold, The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, and What I Loved. The New York Times Book Review called the international best seller What I Loved “superb,” and continued, “What I Loved is a rare thing, a page-turner written at full intellectual stretch, serious but witty, large-minded and morally engaged.” Publisher’s Weekly called it “a gripping, seductive, break-out novel.” Hustvedt is also the author of several memoirs, including last year’s The Shaking Woman: A History of My Nerves, a neurological memoir about Hustvedt own recently developed seizure disorder. Hustvedt will deliver the 2011 Sigmund Freud Lecture in Vienna in May of this year.

Siri Hustvedt’s books are available online here.

On Campus: Author Siri Hustvedt

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Siri Hustvedt, who has written several novels, memoirs, books of essays and short stories, will be on campus for a lecture and panel this Thursday Jan. 27th thanks to Salmagundi Magazine and the English Dept..

The evening will begin with a lecture by Hustvedt ‘exploring the relationship between fiction and memoir’ followed by a panel discussion featuring English Dept. fixtures Robert Boyers, Melora Wolff and Greg Hrbek.

Hustvedt has written three novels: The Blindfold, The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, and What I Loved. The New York Times Book Review called the international best seller What I Loved “superb,” and continued, “What I Loved is a rare thing, a page-turner written at full intellectual stretch, serious but witty, large-minded and morally engaged.” Publisher’s Weekly called it “a gripping, seductive, break-out novel.” Hustvedt is also the author of several memoirs, including last year’s The Shaking Woman: A History of My Nerves, a neurological memoir about Hustvedt own recently developed seizure disorder. Hustvedt will deliver the 2011 Sigmund Freud Lecture in Vienna in May of this year.

Siri Hustvedt’s books are available online here.

That lovely picture of Hustvedt’s work space via this feature from TheGuardian.co.uk