Lecture

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Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf to Speak

Friday, September 21st, 2012

Imam Rauf

Tomorrow, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf will be speaking on campus. The topic of the lecture is “Advancing Peaceful Coexistence Between Christians, Jews, and Muslims.”

Rauf is an author and peace advocate who studies the key role that religion plays in seeking solutions to conflicts in the Middle East. As a leader of the Cordoba Initiative, Rauf spearheaded the proposed Park51 Islamic community center in Lower Manhattan, which caused a silly season tempest in 2010 after opponents claimed the mosque was “too close” to Ground Zero.

According to Skidmore propaganda:

“On the practical front, Imam Feisal has dedicated the Cordoba Initiative to the promulgation of innovative solutions to conflicts in the Middle East in which he sees a large role for the religious communities. Principally, he challenges American Muslims to become leaders in a world-wide Islamic movement to reclaim the Quran in support of modern, moderate, just, open, and egalitarian societies. But he has also challenged Christianity and Judaism to take peacemaking roles as well by delivering justice not religion. The interfaith nature of his concerns underlies his vision to create Cordoba House, a center along the lines of the 92nd Street Y or the Jewish Community Center in NYC.”

Rauf has received numerous awards, and has been named one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in the World and one of Foreign Policy‘s Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2010. If anything, he is a somewhat controversial figure speaking on an issue that is endlessly fascinating. This event is free and open to the public.

Saturday, September 22 in Filene @ 7:30pm

(Via Skidmore)

Lecture: Xenophobia and the Bible

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Xenomorph

Tonight, Paul Walton will deliver a lecture titled “The Other: What Does the Bible Say About Xenophobia?”

Walton is the director of InterVarsity’s New York City Urban Project (NYCUP), a non-profit focused on fighting poverty and human trafficking. Walton will:

Speak and do spoken word about Xenophobia, which is fear of “the other.” He will connect it to race and class, and how xenophobia can lead to mistreatment of others based on factors like these. Furthermore, he will be speaking from a Christian perspective, and why Christians care about this social injustice.

There will be a brief reception a half-hour before the lecture begins at 7pm. There will also be an open discussion of xenophobia on Tuesday, September 25 in the ICC.

Thursday, September 20 in Spa @ 7:30pm. 

Lecture: “Inappropriate” Art in Children’s Books

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Inappropriate? Find out at the lecture

This afternoon, children’s book author/illustrator Elisha Cooper will deliver the annual Fox-Adler Lecture, titled “Inappropriate: The Art of Children’s Books.” The talk will take place at 5:15 in Gannett. A thousand apologies for dropping the ball.

Cooper has written books for children and adults, and has received numerous awards and commendations for his work.

Cooper’s life experience is the source of his creative accomplishments for children as well as adults. The New York Times calls Crawling: A Father’s First Year (2006) “A bravely honest memoir of parenthood.” Dance!, drawing upon Cooper’s own experience taking ballet at Yale to improve his football playing, was a New York Times Ten Best Illustrated winner in 2001. Beach—which presents a summer day at a midwestern beach he visited near Chicago—was a Society of Illustrators Gold Medal best illustrated book of the year in 2006. A visit to the Chicago Zoo with his daughters led to the creation of Beaver is Lost (2010). Cooper’s latest book, Homer (2012), features a big, loyal yellow lab named Homer, named after his own childhood dog.

There will be a reception following the lecture, where copies of Cooper’s book Homer will be available for purchase and signing.

Thursday, September 20 in Gannett @ 5:15pm

Skidmore Literary Society Presents: Steve Woodward

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

Just a coupla wolves

Tonight, assistant editor at Gray Wolf Press, Steve Woodward, will speak in Bolton 280. In the words of the Skidmore Literary Society:

Graywolf Press is an independent, non-profit publisher based out of St. Paul, Minnesota. They publish Tracy K. Smith, the winner of this year’s Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, as well as Skidmore’s own Steve Stern. This will be a great opportunity to hear and ask about editing, the publishing industry, and the literary world.

So, English majors, be sure to ask if he can get you a job/unpaid internship, and remember to refer to the recent Pulitzer hoopla.

Tuesday, April 24 @ 8pm in Bolton 280

(fbook)

Norman Finkelstein to Speak

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Ominous

Tomorrow, Norman Finkelstein will give a lecture entitled “How to Solve the Israel/Palestine Conflict” in Gannett. Finkelstein is a noted author and activist highly critical of Israel. He has written on the Holocaust and Middle East politics for over twenty years, coming to national prominence with his 2000 book The Holocaust Industry, which examined the alleged “misuse” of the Holocaust for political purposes

I don’t like Finkelstein. Beyond the fact that he is a notorious publicity hound, he’s not a particularly good debater (see: Dershowitz/Finkelstein), and—whether he intends it or not—his accusations leveled against Zionists (a word easily replaced with “Jews”) are borderline conspiratorial and directly pander to the worst kinds of antisemitism.

Nevertheless, the lecture is sure to be lively, and if anything, it’ll get people talking on this campus that has so often been charged with political apathy.

If you can’t make the lecture tomorrow, here it is (I would assume) verbatim.

Tuesday, April 24 @ 7pm in Gannett Auditorium

“Father of the Abortion Rights Movement” to Lecture on Campus

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

Bill Baird

Tonight at 7pm, pioneering activist Bill Baird will address the campus, as presented by the Feminist Action Network. As the founder of the Pro Choice League and a prominent voice in the reproductive rights movement for almost half a century, Baird’s lecture—“Who Owns Your Body: Church? State? You! The Fight for Birth Control and Abortion”—is certainly of the utmost relevance, given the recently inflamed national tempest over subsidized contraceptionreligious rights, and proposed anti-abortion legislation.

Baird will discuss his landmark 1972 SCOTUS case, Eisenstadt v. Baird, which established that unmarried couples have a right to possess and use contraception. He will also discuss the current socio-political climate (with an emphasis on the 2012 presidential election) as it relates to the ongoing battle over reproductive rights.

I have a feeling this lecture is going to fill up extremely quickly, so get there as early as possible.

Tuesday, March 20 @ 7pm in Gannett Auditorium

Revolution in the Arab World: The Morning After

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Steve Negus, a reporter specializing on the Middle East, and Sumita Pahwa, a former adjunct professor, will be holding a discussion regarding the recent, historic changes in the Arab world.  The talk is being held from 2-4 on Tuesday in Davis. Unfortunately this is a fairly awkward time but this lecture sounds fantastic.

Negus will discuss “Rebels and Regime Change in Libya,” drawing on first-hand observations of events in Benghazi and Tripoli, from which he recently returned. He will share insight on Libya’s new rebel-led government and what a post-Qaddafi Libya may look like.
Pahwa’s piece of the program, titled “Islamists in Post-Revolution Egypt: Careful What You Wish For,” will focus on how the Muslim Brothers and Salafi movements have shifted gears after the revolution. She’ll discuss the role of religion in a democratic Egypt. <via Scope Online>

So if you got some time tomorrow, put down that Chaucer you’ve been slogging through and head on over to Davis.

Tuesday 2-4 @ Davis Auditorium
Free and open to the public

Lecture: The Global Crisis And Its Aftermath

Monday, April 25th, 2011

Interested in finding out how a culture of greed among rich, white baby boomers has essentially guaranteed that many of you will never achieve the level of financial success made available to your parents? Then you should come see  Associate Professor of Economics Professor Jorg Bibow give the annual William E. Weiss Lecture in Economics on the “The Global Crisis And Its Aftermath” this Tuesday at 5:30pm in Davis.

Bibow’s lecture is built on a Keynesian foundation and feature his own research on the role of central banking and financial systems and the effects of monetary policy on economic performance.

The William E. Weiss Lecture in Economics is made possible with the assistance  of former trustee Arturo Peralto-Ramos III, a member of Skidmore’s Class of 1974. Named in honor of Peralta-Ramos’ stepfather, William E. Weis, the lecture series fosters discussion of contemporary economic issues.

The Rescheduled Siri Hustvedt Event

Monday, February 21st, 2011

The English Dept.’s  Siri Hustvedt lecture and panel discussion that was canceled at the end of last month because New York was buried under a mountain of snow has been rescheduled for this Tuesday (2/22) at 8pm in Emerson.

Siri Hustvedt, who has written several novels, memoirs, books of essays and short stories, will be on campus for a lecture and panel this Thursday Jan. 27th TUESDAY FEB. 22nd thanks to Salmagundi Magazine and the English Dept..

The evening will begin with a lecture by Hustvedt ‘exploring the relationship between fiction and memoir’ followed by a panel discussion featuring English Dept. fixtures Robert Boyers, Melora Wolff and Greg Hrbek.

Hustvedt has written three novels: The Blindfold, The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, and What I Loved. The New York Times Book Review called the international best seller What I Loved “superb,” and continued, “What I Loved is a rare thing, a page-turner written at full intellectual stretch, serious but witty, large-minded and morally engaged.” Publisher’s Weekly called it “a gripping, seductive, break-out novel.” Hustvedt is also the author of several memoirs, including last year’s The Shaking Woman: A History of My Nerves, a neurological memoir about Hustvedt own recently developed seizure disorder. Hustvedt will deliver the 2011 Sigmund Freud Lecture in Vienna in May of this year.

Siri Hustvedt’s books are available online here.

On Campus: Author Siri Hustvedt

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Siri Hustvedt, who has written several novels, memoirs, books of essays and short stories, will be on campus for a lecture and panel this Thursday Jan. 27th thanks to Salmagundi Magazine and the English Dept..

The evening will begin with a lecture by Hustvedt ‘exploring the relationship between fiction and memoir’ followed by a panel discussion featuring English Dept. fixtures Robert Boyers, Melora Wolff and Greg Hrbek.

Hustvedt has written three novels: The Blindfold, The Enchantment of Lily Dahl, and What I Loved. The New York Times Book Review called the international best seller What I Loved “superb,” and continued, “What I Loved is a rare thing, a page-turner written at full intellectual stretch, serious but witty, large-minded and morally engaged.” Publisher’s Weekly called it “a gripping, seductive, break-out novel.” Hustvedt is also the author of several memoirs, including last year’s The Shaking Woman: A History of My Nerves, a neurological memoir about Hustvedt own recently developed seizure disorder. Hustvedt will deliver the 2011 Sigmund Freud Lecture in Vienna in May of this year.

Siri Hustvedt’s books are available online here.

That lovely picture of Hustvedt’s work space via this feature from TheGuardian.co.uk