POCU Stages Sit-in

Written by rackcity on November 19th, 2015

List of demands

Yesterday evening, students came together to discuss, collectively, the racial injustice and discrimination on Skidmore’s campus and created a list of demands for the administration. This morning, the POCU staged a sit-in in front of Palamountain/Bolton and presented these demands.

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People of Color Union (POCU) “What Do We Want and Why?” Tonight

Written by rackcity on November 18th, 2015



Sorry for the shitty photo but GO TO ANY THESE

This evening, the POCU will be creating a list of demands and suggestions for Skidmore’s administration. The union has also organized events through Saturday, which you can find above.

You can also add your voice via a Google Doc here.

If you are cognizant of the racism and discrimination that people of color face at colleges and universities and/or would like to make Skidmore a safer place for students of color, please do consider attending.

7:00 PM in Emerson 

#SkidmoreStandsWithMizzou #ConcernedStudent1950


Three Skidmore Students Hit by Drunk Driver

Written by rackcity on November 1st, 2015

Yesterday night, three Skidmore students were struck by a drunk driver on Clinton Street. Michael Hedges, a first-year student, has passed away while two other students, Toby Freeman and Oban Galbraith, remain in intensive care. President Glotzbach’s remarks can be found here. There will be a campus gathering at 8 p.m. tomorrow evening.

We extend our thoughts to the students and families involved, as well as to the entire Skidmore community.


Paul Farmer to Give Fall Keynote Lecture

Written by rackcity on October 27th, 2015

Speakers Bureau will host their fall keynote speaker, Dr. Paul Farmer on Thursday, November 5 at 7:00 PM in Zankel. A prominent physician and anthropologist, Farmer is the founder of Partners in Health, a global health organization, and serves as Chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has also done extensive work in Haiti, i.e., he is better than Dr. Oz.

Tickets are free for students, faculty, and staff and are available for FREE at the Zankel box office or the Case Desk.



San Fermin to Perform at Zankel Tomorrow Night

Written by rackcity on October 23rd, 2015

Creative direction is a career

“I knew of San Fermin before they came to Skidmore.” Yesterday in class, this scary thought entered my head. I don’t like when my hipster (asshole) shows.

The New Yorker has noted the band’s “epic and emotion-laden rock… glorious and operatic vocals, electronic break beats, horns, strings, and other flourishes.” For those of us who have no musical sensibility, take these two lines from the song “Sonsick:”

Now I know it’s just another fuck, ’cause I’m old enough
Sell lies like they’re only drugs, here to pick me up

If the above doesn’t sum up my time here as a jaded, moderately attractive young woman at a leafy (dark) liberal arts college, I don’t know what does.

It’s guys too talented for their own good. It’s girls that take acapella too seriously. It’s San Fermin. And it’s tomorrow night at Zankel.

For the Facebook event, click here.

Saturday, October 24th at 7 PM


Skidmore Theater Premiers “Our Town”

Written by VirgoClown on October 22nd, 2015

The real star here is that thick-ass tie.

Tonight through October 28th, you have the chance to see Our Town in the JKB’s Black Box theater.  Now, you might be thinking to yourself one of two things:



2) “Bro, what the FUCK is Our Town?”

Regardless of where you are on this spectrum, check it out because it means a lot to a lot of people and it’s being directed by a straight-up MADMAN (avant-guarde director Phil Soltanoff) who the last time he was at Skidmore made a group of puppets actors mime the whole Death of a Salesman movie (you know, that one you probably watched in high school) on stage for two hours with the movie playing in the background.  And if that’s not theater, I don’t know what i–wait, is that theater?  Fuck it, the show is two hours and there’s still time to go out drinking after.

“Our Town” runs from October 22nd through October 28th. Performances are at 8pm except the Sunday matinee (2pm). To reserve seats, call the Skidmore Theater Box Office at (518) 580-5439, email boxoffice@skidmore.edu, or go to their Facebook page.


October Poem 2015 at the Tang

Written by rackcity on October 14th, 2015

DFW is that you????

Artist and poet Joshua Beckman has been at the Tang this week leading “site-specific explorations in poetry and performance responding to the landscape, architecture, history, and creatures of Saratoga Springs. Lunchtime poetry readings/performances will include readings from poems in progress and making improvised poems while walking through the landscape.” If making improvised poems while painting with all the colors of the wind is your thing, go to this. I saw him in the Spa yesterday and he looked vaguely freaked out/chill.

His last reading will be tomorrow, Thursday, October 15 at 12:30 at the Tang.


Triple Threat Comedy and Auction

Written by hangnail on October 9th, 2015

Triple Threat Comedy and Auction

It’s the time of year again (specifically Friday, 9pm Gannett) when The Sketchies, The Ad-Libs and Skidomedy perform for your cash. Because as my dad always says, it’s not prostitution if someone’s laughing.

triple threat

Why? Because Comfest. Next to a summer class on Miley Cyrus, and a poo joke from Colbert, this is the only Skidmore event we’re actually proud to be famous for and with good reason. Besides curbing our crippling Seasonal Affect Disorder for a couple days, this February festival brings together college comedy groups from across the country as well as headlining acts like Tig Notaro, Harvard Sailing Team, UCB All-Stars, Derrick Comedy, Tim Meadows, I could go on, but the New York Times already has.

There’s a live auction after the performance where the comedians “get weird,” but don’t worry, we plebs get to get in on the laughs too. All the money goes to the festival and the auction is consistently pretty fun/ny.

Past auction items have included:

  • Shaving a comedian’s handlebar mustache
  • A phone call with a comedians mom
  • A comedian will make a scene at the time of your choosing
  • Singing telegram
  • Any two comedians making out (almost always two dudes, because apparently that’s funny)
  • And my personal favorite a $5 bill.

Word is they will be raffling off the very first ComFest weekend pass (usually valued at a whole $20.00 and sold out within hours of going on sale).

First three (as in triple, of triple threat) of the school’s comedy group’s will perform 10-15 minute sets.

In my experience, Skidomedy will probably serve up some high concept funny poop jokes. With a male majority, they have a sort of bro-ey cool kid vibe that tends to exhibit big characters and premises meant to show off their talented members more than their highly varied writing. Their most famous Triple Threat set included killing off one of their freshman members, and frankly I was as shocked as anyone that people cared about freshmen. MVP Set: Skidomedy Comfest 2014

The Adlibs, comprised mostly of Skidomedy members, is the only improv group featured on Friday. They always impress with quick witted one-liners, extremely attractive members (Skidmore Compliments knows what’s up) and a goofy wavelength of humor that they all seem to be on that we’re not, which is why we are not in the group, despite consistently adequate auditions. MVP set/only set available online for Adlibs: 2014 Comfest

Finally, we have The Sketchies, or as a drunk S.O. reviewer once put it “what fresh hell awaits us?” You’ve probably seen their all-black outfits and thought “why is a high school devised theater troupe is on our campus?” #showmanship. But their dark outfits are matched only by their darker comedy. This female majority group (in reverse ratio to Skidomedy—it’s not a competition but like Bridesmaids) usually starts sketches with with laaaydies lolling, but the Sketchies manage to pull unexpected punched and satirize gender and equality with vocal fry and grindlines—which are clearly more for them than they are for us. MVP Video: Cult Kickstarter

TL;DR Bring cash and go to Triple Threat. Drink until it’s funny Responsibly.


Graham Roberts of the New York Times to Speak on October 15th

Written by rackcity on October 7th, 2015

S0o0o0 ar+$y

Senior Editor in Graphics, Graham Roberts will give his lecture, “Seeing is Believing: Journalism at the New York Times” on Thursday, October 15. The event is funded by the Andrew Mellon Foundation and will be hosted by Speakers Bureau.

Roberts’s work has been recognized by the Emmy’s, the Peabody Awards, and the Cooper Hewitt National Design Awards, among others.

You can check out his portfolio here.

Thursday, October 15 at 7:00 PM in Gannett. 


On Trigger Warnings (Suck One Skidnews)

Written by Executive Editor on October 6th, 2015

A trigger warning is not an invitation for evasion.

According to the Skidmore News, “trigger warnings” – essentially disclaimers in class discussions reminding us to be wary of other students in the room and the intricacies of their own backstories – are an easy ticket out of navigating the more sensitive, complex issues we might encounter. Skidnews writes, “trigger warnings lead to close-mindedness, complacency and intellectual laziness—why think about something hard, when you can think about something easy?”

This, however, is a remarkably short-sighted approach to the nature of trigger warnings. Rather than dissuading students from having frank, open discussions, these disclaimers are a way of pressing students to acknowledge the immediacy of the more fragile issues we might approach in a classroom. Professors are choosing to offer these warnings because these discussions are worth having – because in order to create an intellectual space in which these dialogues can maintain themselves it is important to remember our context. Situating ourselves in a room on a campus where a number of the more “triggering” issues have made direct impressions on the people seated on either side of us does not hinder our ability to engage in honest, insightful, contemplative conversation but rather feeds it. While of course there are students who relish trigger warnings as cop-outs – ways to avoid the necessity to formulate or verbalize opinions on tumultuous topics or to check out of class time all together – the fragment of the student body who this holds true for is a small one (I would argue, a relatively negligible one).

The perceived necessity to think and speak within the confines of extreme political-correctness certainly impacts our willingness to speak candidly on this campus. When we are chastised for our insensitive selection of adjectives it certainly doesn’t perpetuate our desire to speak openly. But this, I feel, is far more dangerous than the implications of a trigger warning. This is a way of curtailing the way we speak rather than adjusting the content of our speech. The trigger warning doesn’t encourage us to communicate in any particular way, but rather, reminds us of the immediacy of the content of our discussions. It reminds us that being distinctly aware of the campus we live on and the students it houses is crucial when it comes to establishing our own opinions on matters like sexual assault, race relations and gender equality. Trigger warnings pull our focus closer to the reality of these phenomenons, rather than censoring them out of our discussions as a whole.

An issue that triggers is generally one worthy of dialogue and as Nora Grubb claimed in an impressive tirade against the narrow mindedness of the Skidmore news (and a defense of the warnings themselves), “President Glotzbach said he is committed to ‘communicating difficult ideas’ and solving them. Instead of hiding from the former, we must acknowledge that difficult (and scary) things do happen and affect our peers.” Trigger warnings are not about censorship but rather about acknowledging that there are perspectives, vulnerable ones, that supplement our own. Well done to the Skidmore News for instigating an important, relevant discussion on campus, but this is a gleaming example of the editorial board’s obvious inability to truly engage with their own audience. Despite the new and improved web platform, the Skidmore News is hardly a voice for the student body.

A trigger warning invites us to engage in conversation with those of us who are victims of rape, assault, racism, sexism and a number of other abuses. Rather than discouraging us from having these discussions, the disclaimers allow us to acknowledge our peers who have had face-to-face contact with some of the more terrifying realms of of experience both here and far beyond the not-so-sunny little world of Saratoga Springs. We are a vulnerable, intelligent, sensitive, and sometimes jaded amalgamation of inputs when it comes to the more triggering discussions, and for that reason, we should speak with the impressive weight of those perspectives in mind.